Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 24
December 6 - December 13, 1999  
 

Fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Dream Lover [4]
Neil Gaiman's "The Sandman: The Dream Hunters," succeeds in marrying storytelling and fine art, but fans looking for the illustrated novelist's old style are likely to be disappointed.
— Susannah Mandel, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Ríos Grande [5]
Ríos' writing is quiet, graceful, often luscious, but never sentimental or cloying.
— Jim Carvalho, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Non-fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

ReJoyce [6]
Edna O'Brien offers the kind of insight into James Joyce's complicated life that you wouldn't think could be crammed into a mere 200 pages.
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Code Warriors [7]
In "The Code Book," Simon Singh weds historiography and science writing in an admirably lucid account of the evolution of cryptography.
— Damon Smith, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Great Expectations [8]
In fiction, memoir, and history, the big question is where to begin.
— Leonard Gill, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Southwest Heir Lines [9]
In the marvelous, haunting "Open Range and Parking Lots," Virgil Hancock photographs the ruins of post-World War II commerce in dying small towns of the rural Southwest.
— Ray Pride, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 

Now What? [11]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


T







LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

he mystery and suspense novels of Ruth Rendell transcend their genre. Her quietly elegant style, grasp of the complexity of human motivations, and expert turning of the screws of suspense raise her above her workaday colleagues.

Though he is just 29 and has only published one collection of nine short stories, Nathan Englander has instantly become one of those rare public figures whose opinions are heatedly sought, meticulously recorded, and taken directly to heart.

Edna O'Brien's new biography of James Joyce is a chilling plunge into the pool of sorrow, weirdness and beauty that is the life and work of this great writer.

Also, the return of Neil Gaiman's Sandman illustrated fantasy series, an entertaining history of codes and ciphers, and more.


Features
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Mysteries of Life [2]
Ruth Rendell clues readers into literate, streamlined mysteries.
— Michael Sims, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
The Last Fool of Chelm [3]
How Nathan Englander Survives His New Fame.
— David Garza, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Poetry
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Making Strides [10]
"The Yellow Shoe Poets" is no ordinary anthology.
— Ashley Fantz, MEMPHIS FLYER
 


Build your own custom paper. To find out more about this feature, click here.


Search & Archives
Search the archives using the form below or browse through them by issue, author, or column.

Enter one or more keywords to search for:







Page Back Last Issue Current Issue Next Issue Page Forward

Books: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Cover . News . Film . Music . Arts . Books . Comics . Search

Weekly Wire    © 1995-99 DesertNet, LLC . Info Booth . Powered by Dispatch