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Memphis Flyer Turn Up That Noise!

DECEMBER 7, 1999: 

Nine Inch Nails The Fragile (Nothing/Interscope)

All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy.

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All anger (and no joy) makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes "Trent" a dull boy.

All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy.

All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy? All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. (All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy.) All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. "All anger and no joy" makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger -- and no joy -- makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy. All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy.

All anger and no joy makes Trent a dull boy! -- Stephen Grimstead


Miles Davis Walkin' and Modern Jazz Giants (Prestige 50th Anniversary Commemorative Editions)

Two remarkable musical events immediately come to mind when one looks at the early solo career of trumpeter Miles Davis. The first occurred soon after Davis left Charlie Parker's band, when he and arrangers Gil Evans and John Lewis recorded the landmark Birth of the Cool nonet sessions in 1949, recordings that marked Davis' first date as a leader. Seven years later, Davis formed his first great quintet, the 1956 combo that featured John Coltrane, consistently ranked as one of the best small groups in jazz history.

Although Davis recorded a number of albums between 1949 and 1956, most are overshadowed by the sheer brilliance of Birth of the Cool and the unmatched talent of the quintet with Coltrane. However, Davis recorded some fine music between '49 and '56. Walkin' and Modern Jazz Giants, both recorded in 1954, are excellent records with stellar sidemen. They're two of the best Davis recordings from the era and stand as important documents of his early career.

On Walkin', the great trombonist J.J. Johnson and tenor saxophonist Lucky Thompson join Davis on the two opening tunes, blues numbers with soulful solos and tasteful ensemble work. Miles also introduces his classic composition "Solar," a tune that featured Davis playing with a Harmon mute, a key element of his legendary ballad style and a sound that would become his trademark. The session is anchored by the extraordinary rhythmic trio of pianist Horace Silver, bassist Percy Heath, and drummer Kenny Clarke.

Modern Jazz Giants features the only meeting of Davis, vibraphonist Milt Jackson, and pianist Thelonious Monk, a collaboration that lives up to the title's superlative boast. The interaction between Monk and Miles sets up a dynamic tension that drives the disc, for these two nearly came to blows in the studio over how Monk should accompany Miles. Each sticks to his own turf, providing an intriguing stylistic juxtaposition as Miles' graceful, lyrical improvisations contrast with Monk's unique rhythmic comping and soloing. Above it all, Jackson soars with his usual beauty and precision. Also included is a version of Monk's "Round Midnight," part of the 1956 sessions with tenor saxophonist John Coltrane that initiated Davis' next era.

Both of these recordings are exquisitely remastered using a superior JVC digital program and offer the best sound quality yet of these treasured sessions. These are part of a limited edition series, so grab them while you can (be careful to get these clearly packaged new editions; older version are out there as well). Both are highly recommended and show the young genius Miles Davis as he was beginning to develop his own unique and hugely influential sense of style. -- Gene Hyde


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