Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 23
November 29 - December 6, 1999  
 

Features
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Tomorrow Is Better [2]
Walter Meyer is more than just a survivor of Nazi Germany.
— Katherine Catmull, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Non-fiction
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Uncommon Sense [4]
Ellen Willis's "Don't Think, Smile!" reminds us that integrity and human dignity, a quick wit and dead-on style, offer us the hope that we can make sense of this PC-riddled world.
— Michael Bronski, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Lives In Letters [5]
"Letters of the Century" is a chronology of American history revealed by the actual participants themselves.
— Leigh Rich, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
God's Favorite Creatures [6]
New title gives the ubiquitous cockroach its due.
— Michael Sims, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Cob Web [7]
Michael Lewis's Silicon Valley-based "The New New Thing" delivers some laughs and spoonfuls of insider details, but what's surprising is how... how dull it is.
— Jason Gay, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Now It's Jazz: Writings on Kerouac and The Sounds [8]
An impressionistic book that reads more like a diary, a mixture of notes to oneself, impressions, dreams, letters, and reflections.
— Mladen Baudrand, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Now What? [9]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


W





LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

alter Meyer is a concentration camp survivor who has written, "I accuse the world, and I can hardly cope with man's inhumanity to man." And yet his engagement with life and adventure is unparalleled, even in the face of history's worst horrors.

For Ellen Willis, a journalist whose mind and political framework are open enough to reach often surprising conclusions, the Nineties have been years of crises met with a sheer refusal to question received wisdom or engage in substantive deliberation.

"Letters of the Century" is more than an enjoyable romp through the personal mail of well-known and anonymous 20th-century individuals. It is a chronology of American history revealed in preserved moments by the actual participants themselves.

Also, a natural and cultural history of cockroaches, a kaleidoscope of fierce emotions with an intriguing plot, a dull look inside Silicon Valley, and more.


Fiction
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Gods Go Begging [3]
A kaleidoscope of fierce emotions with an intriguing plot.
— Ann Peterpaul, WEEKLY ALIBI
 


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