Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 21
November 15 - November 22, 1999  
 

Features
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Object of Affection [2]
What's the big deal about Ayn Rand?
— Ashley Fantz, MEMPHIS FLYER
 

Fiction
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A Place At The Table [3]
Michael Downing's "Breakfast with Scot" in an introspective tale about two gay men made uncomfortable by the presence of an undeniable sissy.
— David Valdes Greenwood, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Old Pueblo Passage [4]
Holden Caulfield's spirit lurks everywhere in Naked Pueblo.
— Randall Holdridge, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Non-fiction
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A Guy Thing [5]
In "Stiffed," Susan Faludi attempts to prove that the '90s man is in the midst of a collective identity crisis brought on by society's emphasis on looks, power, and stardom.
— Megan Harlan, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Conversations with God [6]
A book that reminds us that, from the Big Bang to tiny quarks to the twinkle in a young girl's eye, this universe is truly miraculous.
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Mob Rules [7]
This slice of high-level Mafia existence definitely belongs on the shelves of two different libraries--collections on organized crime and those on the Kennedy assassination.
— Emil Franzi, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Full Exposure [8]
Ian Gittler uncovers secrets of the porn industry in "Pornstar."
— Shelly Ridenour, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 


D






LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

espite Ayn Rand's rally for individualism, her works have drawn a cult-like following from those who identify with the novelist's theory of objectivism, an atheistic school of thought based on man's ability to rely on rational thought over spiritual or religious faith.

Michael Downing has a jeweler's knack for rendering beauty in miniature, and his fourth novel, "Breakfast with Scot," is an introspective tale of two gay men made uncomfortable by the presence of an undeniable sissy.

Susan Faludi starts out to examine why so many men seem so threatened by feminism, but what ultimately emerges is not so much a portrait of an entire culture letting men down, but the prevalence of a more personal form of betrayal: that of sons by their fathers.

Also, reconciling science and religion, a life in the mob, the pratfalls of youth, and more.



Poetry
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In Good Company [9]
A casual spectator might not realize just how much Robert Creeley's long literary career -- he's 73 this year -- has been conducted on the edge.
— Craig Arnold, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Now What? [10]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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