Weekly Wire

Volume III, Issue 18
October 25 - November 1, 1999  
 
Music

Featured Articles
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Return to Rock [2]
Next to Creed, Stone Temple Pilots come across as a subtle, nuanced, musically sophisticated band -- a real return to a classic kind of rock that served as a blueprint for Alice in Chains' blueprint for '90s rock.
— Matt Ashare, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Good Vibes [3]
The jazz world mourns the loss of seminal vibraphonist Milt Jackson.
— Ron Wynn, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
The Road Ahead [4]
Are Linda Ronstadt's touring days over?
— Michael McCall, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Album Reviews
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The Doobie Brothers [7]
The Doobie Brothers "Long Train Runnin': 1970-2000."
— Michael Henningsen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Bennett's Blues [8]
When Tony Bennett sings Duke Ellington, what's not to like? The harp! The harp!
— Richard C. Walls, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Behind Bars [9]
After 31 years, Johnny Cash's "At Folsom Prison" is a surviving portrait of a barely remembered near-past -- one resonates with an almost 19th-century tone of honor, duty, and rectitude.
— Grant Alden, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Lee Hazelwood [10]
Reissues of Lee Hazelwood's "Trouble Is a Lonesome Town" and "Requiem for an Almost Lady."
— Michael Henningsen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
String Benders [11]
Talented string players join forces for commanding, genre-bashing new projects.
— Michael McCall, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Wacky Packs [12]
Redman and Method Man's just-released "Blackout" balances stentorian outrageousness with bracingly economical wordplay chiseled out of mesquite.
— Alex Pappademas, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Now What? [15]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

T he grungy hard-rock/heavy-metal band Creed not only debuted at #1 with their new Human Clay but did so in the face of stiff competition from Garth Brooks and the hip-hop duo of Method Man and Redman.

Vibraphonist Milt Jackson, who died recently, was acknowledged as a superb soloist, dynamic accompanist, and mentor to a stylistically diverse group of musicians.

Like many musicians, George Jones' prodigious talents rose above the havoc he left in his wake. But it's been a wild, terrifying thrill-ride of a life, a story more heartbreaking and bizarre than the songs the Ol' Possum sings.

Plus, Linda Ronstadt ponders retirement, a Doobie Brothers box retrospective, Tony Bennett sings Duke Ellington, and more!


Artist Profiles
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The Nine Lives of Ol' Possum [5]
An overview of country legend George Jones' life and career.
— Jerry Renshaw, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Hectic but Good [6]
Profile of country/bluegrass singer-songwriter Jim Lauderdale.
— Margaret Moser, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Mini Reviews
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Boston Phoenix CD Reviews [13]

  • Mike Ness
  • Live
  • Onda Sonora
  • The Wiseguys
  • Quickspace
  • The Blue Hawaiians
  • John Blair Party
  • Greg Bendian's Trio Pianissimo

Rhythm and Views [14]
  • Bell
  • The Nomads

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