Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 18
October 25 - November 1, 1999  
 

Features
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Off the Wall [2]
Humorist P.S. Wall offers her skewed view on life and love.
— Michael Sims, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
A Portrait of the Artist as a Grad Student [3]
David Garza uses a new history of the Iowa Writers' Workshop to question whether creative writing can be taught.
— David Garza, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Non-fiction
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Southern Queers [7]
John Howard's fascinating "Men Like That: A Southern Queer History" is a shining and important addition to the canon of gay history.
— Martin Wilson, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Crossroad Blues [8]
In "A Right To Sing the Blues," tackles the black/Jewish relationship in the entertainment industry from a snide perspective.
— Chris Fujiwara, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
More Than Noise [9]
Craig O'Hara's "The Philosophy of Punk."
— Mary Walling Blackburn, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Accept All Substitutes [10]
Naomi Klein's "No Logo" damns corporate marketing with a naive grasp of pre-Reagan consumerism.
— Robert David Sullivan, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
No Conflict, No Fiction [11]
David L. Caffey's "Land of Enchantment, Land of Conflict: New Mexico in English-Language Fiction."
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Poetry
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Death Defying [12]
Renée Gregorio's "The Storm That Tames Us."
— San Juanita Garza, WEEKLY ALIBI
 


S







LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

yndicated for just two years, P.S. Wall's column is already carried by 21 newspapers, including one in Australia. From an unpaid weekly column in one small town paper, this humorist has risen to a weekly audience of 5 million.

If Emily Dickinson had sat through weekly writing workshops and pursued a Master's in Fine Arts (MFA) degree, could she have endured the harsh weekly questioning of her fellow students?

In "Men Like That," John Howard mixes historical documentation with personal oral history to create an intimate portrait of gay life in Mississippi from 1945 to 1985.

Plus, poetry on surviving death, blacks, Jews and the blues, a whale of a tale from a new perspective, and more.



Fiction
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Distance No Object [4]
Gloria Frym's story collection is possibly ahead of its time while masquerading as an elegy for an end to an era.
— Lissa Richardson, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Collectors [5]
Paul Griner's novel is spare, elegant, and disturbing -- its very emptiness creates a chill psychological breeze.
— Katherine Catmull, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Ahab's Wife [6]
"In Ahab's Wife," Sena Jeter Naslund sacrifices artistic craft and sensibility for an agenda.
— Stacy Bush, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Now What? [13]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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