Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 17
October 18 - October 25, 1999  
 

Fiction
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Feels Like Home [3]
In her novel The Ladies Auxilliary, Tova Mirvis explores being Jewish in Memphis.
— Ashley Fantz, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Growing Pains [4]
Lynda Barry's "Cruddy" is a stunningly good coming-of-age novel.
— Megan Harlan, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Plain Livin' [5]
Kent Haruf's latest novel "Plainsong" gives voice to rough-hewn Westerners.
— John Freeman, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Non-fiction
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America's Dark Atomic Past [6]
It's amazing what a wealth of information a few persistent inquiries can ultimately yield.
— Dorothy Cole, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Celebrated for the Least of Reasons [7]
Chronicle reviewer Tom Doyal has took to writin' just like Larry L. King, the playwright behind "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas."
— Tom Doyal, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Soft Cell [8]
Tap into "I Listen: A Document of Digital Voyeurism."
— Shelly Ridenour, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 
Ethics for the New Millennium [9]
The Dalai Lama's statement of hope for the world in the next century.
— Barbara Chisholm, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
The Wanderer [10]
Niven managed to keep safe in a world of violence and intrigue by nothing more (nor less) than an ironclad sense of honor and sober industry.
— Randall Holdridge, TUCSON WEEKLY
 


E







LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

ileen Welsome has written a book about experiments with plutonium on average Americans. "The Plutonium Files" details stunning ethical lapses, which, the author says, were made in the name of patriotism, public relations, self-promotion, elitism and arrogance. The Weekly Alibi reviewer calls it "a definitive reference book for a significant chapter in modern history."

In her first novel, Tova Mirvis beautifully captures a community of women who, because they are confronted by an outsider, end up questioning their own values.

Do you use a cell phone? Do you watch what you say when you do? If not, you might be interested in a new book that samples widely from the airwaves occupied by cell phone users.

Also, a coming-of-age novel from Lynda Barry, the letters of Larry L. King, a statement of hope from the Dalai Lama, and more.



Features
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Cold War Crimes [2]
An interview with author Eileen Welsome about her new book, "The Plutonium Files."
— Dennis Domrzalski, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Poetry
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Well-Versed [11]
How should we read poetry? Let us count the ways...
— Diann Blakely, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Now What? [12]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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