Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 12
September 13 - September 20, 1999  
 
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Non-fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

A Worker's Life [3]
Po Bronson's "The Nudist on the Late Shift" spells out some naked truths about Silicon Valley.
— Michael Joseph Gross, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Would You Like Some More Bob? [6]
A history of cannibalism... and recipes, too!
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Warped Speed [7]
James Gleick's "Faster" is too quick a study of the accelerating pace of contemporary life.
— Damon Smith, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
They Thought, Therefore They Were [8]
"The Philosophers" covers the lives and ideas of 28 greats from Socrates to Sartre, so there isn't a lot of time or space for depth.
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
'The Scalpel and the Silver Bear' [9]
A Navajo woman and a surgeon, Dr. Lori Arviso Alvord advocates for more humanized patient care.
— Dorothy Cole, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Now What? [10]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


A






LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

lfredo Véa's third novel, "Gods Go Begging," is conceived so ambitious thematically and stylistically, and so timely in its interests, that it surely deserves a broad readership. Included with the review is an interview with the author, a Weekly Wire exclusive.

Po Bronson has a great talent for translating the technicalities of Internet culture, but his new examination of Silicon Valley fails to ask what happens when work swallows life.

Beginning with a fascinating history of cannibalism, a new cookbook quickly moves on to discuss such concerns as choosing the right cut of meat and expanding your basic kitchen utensil collection to include the electric hacksaw and baseball bat (for tenderizing).

Plus, a look at the quickening pace of contemporary life, an introduction to great Western thinkers, and more.


Fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Crime With Passion [2]
"Gods Go Begging" is a work so ambitious thematically and stylistically, and so timely in its interests, that it surely deserves a broad readership.
— Randall Holdridge, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Dysfunction Junction [4]
Meet Chuck Palahnuik's lowlifes and Maggie Estep's ranters.
— Ashley Fantz, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Historical Romance [5]
Despite brief nods to labor party politics, the suffragette movement and colonial rule, "Cinnamon Gardens" bears all the markings of a historical romance.
— Mary Walling Blackburn, WEEKLY ALIBI


Build your own custom paper. To find out more about this feature, click here.


Search & Archives
Search the archives using the form below or browse through them by issue, author, or column.

Enter one or more keywords to search for:







Page Back Last Issue Current Issue Next Issue Page Forward

Books: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Cover . News . Film . Music . Arts . Books . Comics . Search

Weekly Wire    © 1995-99 DesertNet, LLC . Info Booth . Powered by Dispatch