Weekly Wire
Books
Volume II, Issue 7
August 10 - August 17, 1998  
 
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Something To Talk About [2]
The Library of Contemporary Thought hopes to spark a series of national conversations about provocative ideas. Fat chance?
— Scott Stossel, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Media Mix [3]
You can't buy a single magazine on the newsstand that offers the variety and originality of Salon, a free entertainment daily on the Web.
TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Texas Tropes [4]
Nothing, absolutely nothing, about Texas literature or film escapes author and man of letters Don Graham.
— Claiborne Smith, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Can Don Graham Say That? [5]
Quotes from Don Graham.
AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Giant Country [6]
Don Graham's book of essays, "Giant Country: Essays on Texas."
— Jesse Sublett, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Fiction
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Slaughter of the Innocence [7]
Robert Bingham's "Pure Slaughter Value".
— Brendan Doherty, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Non-fiction
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Licensed To Ill [8]
Bernard Leflowitz's "Our Guys" rehashes suburban jock worship with a tragic tale of high-school rape.
— Jason Gay, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Grand Adventure [9]
Photographer Kathleen Jo Ryan and 15 women writers of her choosing have pooled a wealth of words and images in "Writing Down the River," A Grand Canyon journey.
— Mari Wadsworth, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Now What? [13]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


L









LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

eading off this week--a publishing house goes out on a commercial limb by beginning the Library of Contemporary Thought. The LCT is a series of short books written by contemporary writers discussing modern life. Randon House has launched this series with hopes that these budget-priced books will get people thinking again on important cultural topics. It's a fascinating article (and the books sound terrific too.)

The Memphis Flyer's Leonard Gill reviews the new memoir from Christopher Dickey on his famous/infamous father, poet James Dickey, in "Summer of Deliverance." Part of this was published in The New Yorker and we're here to offer our own opinion--read this review and pick up the book.

Don Graham, University of Texas professor, president of the Texas Institute of Letters, and VERY outspoken commentor/critic on all literature and film dealing with Texas is profiled in "Texas Tropes." If that wasn't enough, we have pithy quotes from Graham and a review of his book, "Giant Country: Essays on Texas."


Mini Reviews
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Speed Reader [12]
"Too Much Coffee Man's Guide for the Perplexed" by S. Wheeler; "Memories of My Father Watching TV" by C. White; "Surfing San Onofre" by D. James; "Quite a Year for Plums" by B. White.
— Blake de Pastino, Jessica English, Stephen Ausherman, Brendan Doherty, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Poetry
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Transcontinental Vision [10]
Arthur Sze's "The Redshifting Web" collects 30 years of a quietly visionary poet.
— David Penn, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Truth & Consequences [11]
A new memoir by Christopher Dickey tells of life with his father, James Dickey: poet, husband, father, son, horror show.
— Leonard Gill, MEMPHIS FLYER
 


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