Weekly Wire
Books
Volume II, Issue 6
August 3 - August 10, 1998  
 
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In The Black [2]
Cowboy poet Baxter Black is a kind of dirt-road Martha Stewart.
— Leo Banks, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Webb on the Web [3]
An interview with genre-bending author Don Webb.
— Jon Lebkowsky, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Media Mix [4]
The top 100 ways to feel stupid.
TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Fiction
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Fall From Grace [5]
Keith Ridgway's "The Long Falling".
— Stephen Ausherman, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Enter the Hugos [6]
Our annual roundup of this year's Hugo Award winners.
— Adrienne Martini, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Meaty Commentary [7]
"If we can't act on knowledge, then we can't survive without ignorance" seems to be Ruth L. Ozeki's message in her novel, "My Year of Meats."
— Stephan Faris, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Waiting is the Hardest Part [8]
Summer finds local novelist Bradley Denton in the heated throes of writer's block.
— Mike Shea, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Mini Reviews
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Speed Reader [11]
"Shelf Space," "The Ibis Tapestry," "Naked," "Trees and Shrubs of the Trans-Pecos"
— Blake de Pastino, Jennifer L.X. Scharn, Angie Drobnic and Chris Johnson, WEEKLY ALIBI
 


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

ow, it's another section packed with goodies this week! Where to start? Baxter Black, the ex-large animal vet-- now cowboy poet, is profiled. His self published books and tapes have sold well and his performances are consistantly SRO. Mr. Black is one interesting guy.

The Austin Chronicle's Adrienne Martini takes a savage look at this year's crop of Hugo award winners in "Enter the Hugos." We loved every minute of this story. And, if you're a Science Fiction fan, you will too.

In the Non-Fiction section, be sure to check out "Zarafe," Michael Allin's book documents the the wild reaction Parisians had to the first giraffe arriving in Paris in 1826. Only "zarafamania" can describe what occurred.

Charles Bowden has collected 13 Mexican photojournalists to examine the corrupt city of Juarez in "Juarez: The Laboratory of Our Future." Using both startling images and savage essays, Bowden has described a city seemingly devouring itself with greed.

But don't stop there--keep reading!


Non-fiction
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Boundary Issues [9]
In "Juarez: The Laboratory of Our Future," 13 Mexican photojournalists offer a scaring portrait of a city run on greed and violence.
— Fred Turner, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Zarafamania [10]
"Zarafe" tells the true story of the giraffe that sparked a craze in eighteenth century Paris.
— Leonard Gill, MEMPHIS FLYER
 

Now What? [12]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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