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Books
Volume III, Issue 4
July 19 - July 26, 1999  
 
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Fiction
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War Memories [3]
Novelist Pat Barker's "Another World" chases the ghosts of World War One around the home front.
— John Freeman, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
From Bluegrass To Sagebrush [4]
"Thirsty Woman" won't make any Great Books lists, but it's a natural Zonie read.
— Christine Wald-Hopkins, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Incomplete Guide [5]
Melissa Bank's "The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing" leaves readers in search of more.
— Katherine Guckenberger, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Frightful Feast [6]
"Hannibal" will fulfill your appetite for suspense.
— Brian Andrew Laird, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Mini Reviews
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Off the Bookshelf [10]

  • "Eyes Wide Open: A Memoir of Stanley Kubrick" by Frederic Raphael
  • "Rebels in White Gloves" by Miriam Horn
  • "Other People's Dirt" by Louise Rafkin
  • "Just Desserts" by Jerry Oppenheimer
 
Speed Reader [11]
  • "Home Waters" by Joseph Monninger
  • "Paris Trance" by Geoff Dyer
 
Book Reviews [12]
  • "Essential Saltes: An Experiment" by Don Webb
  • "True at First Light: A Fictional Memoir" by Ernest Hemingway
 
Now What? [13]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

arcel Duchamp wanted to don a pair of X-ray Specs in order to see the reality behind reality and thereby plunge into the depths of a new realm of artistic expression.

Controversies rage over the roles of black and white musicians in the development of jazz and blues, and the works of three authors attempt to navigate this racial minefield.

Pat Barker's new novel delivers a powerfully grim meditation on the prolonged, corrosive fallout of war.

Lana Witt writes with a comfortable, sometimes ironic Southern ease and gives us fresh, concrete metaphors in her second novel.

Plus, a history of board games, a volume of poetry, and more.



Features
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Marcel Duchamp's X-Ray Specs [2]
Why did University of Texas art historian Linda Dalrymple Henderson spend nine years investigating the work of artist and arch-trickster Marcel Duchamp?
— Sid Moody, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Non-fiction
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Black, White, and Blue [7]
Three new books tackle thorny racial issues in jazz.
— Ron Wynn, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Serious Games [8]
David Parlett's "The Oxford History of Board Games."
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Poetry
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The Music of Ideas [9]
In his "Picnic on the Moon." poet Charles Coe's tone is humble, self-effacing, implying a sigh and a roll of the eyes and a good-natured "Here's what it's taken me years to learn!"
— Catherine A. Salmons, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 


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