Weekly Wire
Books
Volume I, Issue 54
June 15 - June 22, 1998  
 
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Letters At 3 AM [2]
Normon Mailer's "The Time of Our Time" smacks of the posthumous.
— Michael Ventura, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
As Queer as It Gets [3]
The meta-trashy prose of Christian McLaughlin.
— Claiborne Smith, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Fiction
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Stick 'Em Up [4]
Price uses his well-developed gift for seamy reportage and his knack for veristic melodrama to focus on the thorny topic of race.
— Richard C. Walls, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
The West's End [5]
An admirably bullheaded and grandiose close to the Border Trilogy turns its back on the notion that the frontier offers any hope of redemption or salvation.
— Tom Scocca, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Sex Toys of the Gods [6]
Review of "Sex Toys of the Gods."
AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Sedate Skinwalker [7]
"Twilight Boy," by Timothy Green, could have been a very good and exciting novel. Instead, it turns out to be a so-so story.
— Michael Peel, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Non-fiction
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"Housekeeper[s], Maniac" [8]
Two hundred years later and a woman's work is still never done. A survey of books on housework.
— Leonard Gill, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Aristocratic Insight [9]
The Hamptons are revealed to the plebeian masses.
— Leigh Rich, TUCSON WEEKLY
 


W







LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

ho else but Norman Mailer would stage his own death? Like a suicidal narcissist whose longing for oblivion is overridden by the desire to hear what people say about him at his funeral, Mailer has gone passive-attentive on us. That's right, passive-attentive. How? By releasing a posthumous collection humously. He doesn't admit that, of course, but the need to control how people perceive you after you're gone blinks above the volume like a neon reading light. And Michael Ventura, a literary artist in his own right, has taken the fluorescent bait. He's reviewed Mailer's book less as a work than as a summation of the man's life and stature. Norman Mailer, where are you? You'll want to read this.


Mini Reviews
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Just Can't Get Enough [11]
More summer reading: reviews of new releases from Dorothy Allison, Peter Fonda, Gary Cartwright, and more.
AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Poetry
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Rest in Paz [10]
"His Collected Poems" does much to give English-language readers a full view of the remarkable Mexican poet Octavio Paz -- one of the greatest of the 20th century -- and it is a fitting monument.
— Gregory McNamee, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Now What? [12]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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