Weekly Wire

Arts & Leisure

Volume I, Issue 53
June 8 - June 15, 1998  
 
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

I t's summertime, summertime, sum-sum-summertime. For some that means staying indoors, where it's air-conditioned, or maybe going out for a swim. For others that means more substantial adventure. If you fall into the latter camp, you may want to read one of the region-based advice columns in this week's arts section. Over here we've got an all-purpose guide to taking care of yourself in desert climes. Over there we've got an invaluable rundown of facts about poison ivy, which can turn your most optimistic hiking hopes into itchy nightmares. So what are you waiting for? Read through Weekly Wire's arts section, then get out there and explore.

We've also got reviews of several interesting new plays, a question-and-answer session about flamenco dancing, and -- my favorite -- a look at some site-specific artwork that juxtaposes the flexible human form against the blue expanse above. Since when must performance art be restricted to stages and halls, anyway? As far as these artists are concerened, the sky's the limit.


In the Gallery
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Lost in Space [9]
Sally Jacques' site-specific work "Probe One: Impossible Destiny" asks, "Where are you?"
— Robert Faires, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
John Scott's Optical Jazz [10]
John Scott's sculpture evokes the mellow celestial lyricism of Coltrane ballads.
— D. Eric Bookhardt, GAMBIT WEEKLY
 










Featured Articles
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Viva Flamenco [2]
An Interview with the director of Festival Flamenco Internacional.
— Angie Drobnic, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Recreation
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The Vile Vine [3]
How to live -- itch-free -- with poison ivy.
— Debbie Gilbert, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Heat Beat [4]
You don't know an environment until you've experienced it during the climate that makes it different from everywhere else.
— Kevin Franklin, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Performance
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Boarding School Blues [5]
Murderous roommates at odds are just one of the elements playwright Rich Amada deftly juggles in his funny new play, "The Wimpley School for Wayward Girls."
— Margaret Regan, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Bringing Up "Baby" [6]
Review of the offbeat musical "Baby."
— Dalt Wonk, GAMBIT WEEKLY
 
Catwalk Caterwaul [7]
The delicious kitsch of the all-American beauty pageant is brought to subversive life in "Pageant," a musical spoof.
— Margaret Regan, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Exhibitionism [8]
Reviews of "Godspell '98" and "Our Town."
AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Now What? [11]
A gallery of captivating links to keep your imagination churning while the paint dries.
WEEKLY WIRE
 

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