Weekly Wire

Volume II, Issue 50
June 7 - June 14, 1999  
 
Music

Artist Profiles
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Folk Tales [4]
Ani DiFranco explains how she's managed to make a living through art without selling out.
— Matt Ashare, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Holding Out [5]
Mary Chapin Carptenter, one of Music Row's few remaining singer-songwriter successes.
— Michael McCall, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
A Survivor's Journey [6]
Long one of Austin's most accomplished fiddle players, Darcie Deaville reveals her chilling "Survivor's Journey" on her solo debut, Tornado in Slo Mo,.
— Jay Hardwig, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Jew's Blues [7]
Fresh off an Israel tour, guitarist Dave Specter considers the Jewish musicians who've made their mark on the blues.
— Mitch Myers, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 
Scared of Chaka Rock On [8]
Scared of Chaka are all smiles when it comes to where they've been, how far they've come and where they intend to go.
— Michael Henningsen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
The Dopy Show [9]
MTV VJ-turned-rocker Jesse Camp brings back the grand old days of Poison and Motley Crue.
— Lorne Behrman, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Album Reviews
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Atomic Bomb [10]
Public Enemy's online-only CD, "There's a Poison Goin' On . . . " comes on strong with syncopated explosions, pump-shotgun drum loops, whinnying flutes, and more.
— Alex Pappademas, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Tornado in Slo Mo [11]
Darcie Deaville's new album reviewed.
— Christopher Hess, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Turn Up That Noise! [12]
New "Ellington at Newport" sets the record about this concert straight.
— Gene Hyde, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Now What? [15]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

B luegrass music sounds as if it's older than the hills themselves, but it originated fairly recently, in the early Forties, through the music of Bill Monroe and his band.

Whether you own a computer or not, the Internet is changing the way we select, buy, and listen to music.

There's Ani the songwriter and performer, a composite of punk rebel, coffeehouse poet, and feminist crusader, and there's DIY Ani, the maverick entrepreneur who started her own record company when she was just 19.

Mary Chapin Carpenter is the last of the mature, acoustic-based singer-songwriters who still has a chance on the country music charts.

Also, "Ellington at Newport" again, Public Enemy, a dozen new examples of the blues, and more.



Featured Articles
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Hill Country Breakdown [2]
Summer is when bluegrass comes into full bloom. Contemporary practitioners of the form like Bela Fleck, David Grisman, and the Bad Livers are continuing the legacy of this distinctive form of Western music.
— Christopher Hess, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Music@Net.Com [3]
Whether you know it or not, your computer and your stereo are merging.
— Mark Jordan, MEMPHIS FLYER
 

Mini Reviews
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The Dirty Dozen [13]
A dozen new CDs capture the down-and-dirty side of the blues.
— Ted Drozdowski, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Rhythm and Views [14]

  • Bremen Town Musicians
  • Spade Cooley
  • "The Last Soul Company"
 

Build your own custom paper. To find out more about this feature, click here.


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