Weekly Wire
Books

Volume I, Issue 44
April 6 - April 13, 1998

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In Person
Molly Ivins at Book People. [2]
Claiborne Smith

Keyed Up
For at least three centuries, roman clef has exhibited transparent motives: to flirt, to tease, to satirize. Now the form's being revitalized. [3]
Matthew DeBord

Role Play
Marc Stengel whistles Dixie with Tony Horwitz. [4]
Marc K. Stengel


Fiction
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I Am a Camera
Jim Shepard's fictional bio of German Expressionist cinema master F.W. Murnau, Nosferatu, offers glimpses into the ineffable realms of desire, identity, doom, and beauty. [5]
Peter Keough


Non-fiction
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Keeping it Real
Ronin Ro's "Have Gun Will Travel" charts the violent rise of Death Row Records. [6]
Nicholas Patterson

Writes of Spring
New releases from Jo Ann Beard, James B. Twitchell, and Angela Davis. [7]

Messiahs and Mouse Turds
Unlike many of his contemporaries, Charles Simic, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for his collection of poems "The World Doesn't End," has continued to play to his strengths. [8]
David Penn


S









omebody help me: I keep getting Molly Ivins, Ellen Goodman and Maureen Dowd confused! Well, actually, I can't help but remember Maureen Dowd...but Molly Ivins? What's she all about? Guess it's time I took a gander at her new book, "You Got to Dance With Them What Brung You: Politics in the Clinton Years." With a long-winded title like that, I wonder how the book reads.... Hmm, maybe I'll just read this interview with Molly and leave it at that.

A little definition for you: "roman à clef -- A novel in which actual persons, places or events are depicted in fictional guise."

That's something you'll need to know before you delve into this article on novels in the "roman à clef" vein. Apparently there are quite a few of 'em out there, and they're even quite readable...as books often can be.

Speaking of which, here are some of the consumption-worthy works written up in this week's Weekly Wire: "Nosferatu" by Jim Shepard; "The Boys of My Youth" by Jo Ann Beard, "Orphan Factory: Essays and Memoirs" by Charles Simic, and "Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches From the Unfinished Civil War." Not to mention a detailed, grisly history of Death Row Records. And poetry from Jimmy Santiago Baca too.

I love paper.


Poetry
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Life Sentences
How do you become one of America's most well-known poets, headlining this weekend's annual Tucson Poetry Festival? Jimmy Santiago Baca knows. [9]
Charlotte Lowe


Now What?
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets. [10]


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