Weekly Wire
Books

Volume I, Issue 43
March 30 - April 6, 1998

Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

The Originator, Not the Imitator
An interview with author Anna Quindlen. [2]
Marion Winik


Fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

The Wicked Art
Peter Carey's "Jack Maggs." [3]
Steven Robert Allen


Non-fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Jam Session
Self-important and shallow, "Rolling Stone" magazine has redefined politics for a generation of morons. [4]
James DiGiovanna

Aches and Pains
Linda Simon's new bio of William James is a portrait of a neurotic. [5]
Scott Stossel

Side Effects
Drugs intended to cure us can sometimes kill; the Civil War's enduring hold on the South. [6]
Debbie Gilbert and John Branston


Poetry
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Laws of Gravity
Poet J.D. McClatchy's "The Ten Commandments" follows Moses up the mountain. [7]
Graham Christian


Now What?
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets. [9]


A










nna Quindlen, Anna Quindlen, Anna Quindlen. Remember that name. Because lately people have taken to describing female authors based on how they compare to her: "She's like Anna Quindlen on L.S.D.," or "She's like a Jewish Anna Quindlen," or maybe, "Her prose reads like something Anna Quindlen would write after a light workout at the gym." If you read this article, you'll see what I mean. Of course, you should also read it because Quindlen is an accomplished journalist, essayist and novelist who has mucho insight into writing.

Peter Carey also has many writing insights, and he even works them into his novels. Weird, I know. His latest, "Jack Maggs," tells a Dickensian tale that doubles as a critique of fiction writing. I know what you're thinking: how can Carey simultaneously criticize fiction writing while writing a work of fiction? That's a question well-answered by this review.

Elsewhere in Books you'll find the skinny on several fat non-fiction books. Among them is one about William James's various neuroses, and one about the hidden dangers in household drugs (see "Project Censored" in the News section for a related story). But my favorite is James DiGiovanna's acerbic critique of a book about "Rolling Stone" magazine covers, a publication he slams for its political self-importance and rock-n-roll shallowness.

Personally, I gave up on "Rolling Stone" around the time they came out with their Perception / Reality advertising campaign. Because the way I saw it, how could a magazine that pandered to smug, self-righteous yuppies be any better than a magazine that pandered to hairy, ineffectual hippies? Either way, that's some depressing reading.


Mini Reviews
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Speed Reader
"KISS" by Sylvie Simmons; "Led Zeppelin" by Tony Horkins; "Bob Marley" by Scotty Bennett; "The Clash" by Paul Du Noyer. [8]
Michael Henningsen


Build your own custom paper. To find out more about this feature, click here.





Page Back Last Issue Current Issue Next Issue Page Forward

Books: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Cover . News . Film . Music . Arts . Books . Comics

Weekly Wire    © 1995-99 DesertNet, LLC . Info Booth . Powered by Dispatch