Short Runs

Commentary by Ray Pride

*RECOMMENDED



THU/5

*CLUELESS (1995, USA) Directed by Amy Heckerling. Heckerling's career began auspiciously with the blunt, acerbic "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," which probably belongs at the top of the list of such teen comedies as "Heathers," "Valley Girl" and the better parts of "House Party." (Not to mention a whole strain of worthy male-angst art movies, like "Rumble Fish" and "Pump Up The Volume"). In 1982, when "Fast Times" came out, teen movies were mostly softcore trash or horror movies meting out puritanical punishments to long-limbed, promiscuous teens (not unlike "Kids"). "Fast Times," with its unsentimental excursions into teen sex talk, holds up well, but in light of Heckerling's often-wretched subsequent work looked increasingly like a fluke. "Clueless," according to Heckerling, was inspired by Jane Austen's "Emma," with that novel's nineteenth-century concerns transposed to the anxieties of a trio of privileged multicultural princesses, led by the seemingly ditzy Cher (MTV-anointed teen goddess Alicia Silverstone). There's a lot of easy humor drawn from their shopping, verbal bebopping and social spats in their Beverly Hills milieu, and Heckerling and her collaborators make most frames pop with bright colors and gaudy consumables, looking like nothing so much as a not-wholly-successful attempt to appropriate the satirical gloss of an Almodovar comedy. What makes Heckerling's film likable and even striking, despite its uneasy mix of satire, romance and social observation, is its unfolding of layers, letting characters be more than their first appearance would suggest. Cher, deceptively, appears at first to be a mere laughable bubblehead--Ferris Bueller in a miniskirt--but eventually, all of her ministrations in the name of fashion makeovers and social acceptance turn out to be the misapplied energies of a bright, selfless woman-in-the-making. Under the movie's gloss and the story's privilege, lurks a character with a beating heart. 97m. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7.

DISCLOSURE (1994, USA) Directed by Barry Levinson. That's Demi on top; Douglas a-bottom. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11.

EASY CHAIR SALON Two short films, hosted by DePaul assistant professor of philosophy Darrell Moore: Stacy Goldate's 1997 "The World Wasn't Watching," a documentary of the 1996 Festival of Life; and Otis Richardson and Kathleen Rose Winter's 1997 "Church of the Open Door," a commentary about the creation of a church for Chicago residents who are black, and lesbian, gay or transsexual. Free. Center for Communication Resources (773)862-6868, 1419 W. Blackhawk, 7.

*<B>NAKED LUNCH (1992, USA-Canada) Directed by David Cronenberg. Cronenberg imagines Burroughs' novel as a chilly mindfuck of a superior order; writing is a sickness that knows no cure. With Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands. 115m. Shown with Kenneth Anger's 1947 "Fireworks." (20m.) $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 9:30.

*RAISE THE RED LANTERN (1992, China-Taiwan-Hong Kong) Directed by Zhang Yimou. Sex, intrigue and female bonding in the 1920s-set story of a college-educated girl (Gong Li) who becomes the newest wife of a feudal lord. $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7.

*THE LAST METRO (La derniere Metro) (1980, France) Directed by Fran¨ois Truffaut. During the Occupation, an impresario's wife keeps him hidden in the basement. Talky stuff. 133m. $3. International House (773)753-2274, 1414 E. 59th, 7:30.

*THE WALL, THE NEW ERA, THE REVOLUTION A selection of recent avant-garde work from Germany: "The Monument" (1990, 4m) by Klaus Georgi Lutz Stutzner; "Document 89" (1989-90, 21m) by Film and Foto Man Ray; "Crossroads" (1991, 9m) by Raimund Krumme; "Timeslips" (1990, 11m) by Ulrich Lindner; "Germany Hallucination" (1990, 10m) by Oliver Becker; "Colourette" (1992, 21m) by Barbel Freund, Rainer Bellenbaum; "The Confession "(1990, 11m) by Jochen Kuhn; and "Herbert's Melody" (1990, 11m) by Joachim Bode. Free. SAIC, 112 S. Michigan Ave., 13th floor screening room, 7.

THE WEDDING BANQUET (1993, Taiwan) Directed by Ang Lee. Whimsy about a gay Taiwanese man in New York who arranges a marriage to lie to his family. At least it somehow pointed Lee toward "The Ice Storm." 109m. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 6.


FRI/6

*ALIEN RESURRECTION (1997, USA) Directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. For someone who claims their English on the first day of shooting was limited to "Zhut de fokk opp!" Jean-Pierre Jeunet does more-than-capable work in reviving the "Alien" franchise. "Alien Resurrection" suffers from uninspired, gruff obscenity, so-so one-liners, a buoyant yet dull approach to much of the icky-goo and the gore, yet Jeunet, co-director of "Delicatessen" and "City of Lost Children," brings along both his rich, dark palette and his gifted cameraman Darius Khondji, to great effect. The movie's 103-minute running time is mostly chase, with a few privileged moments of glare from the reincarnated, muscular mutant Ripley of Sigourney Weaver. Khondji loves Weaver's face and limbs, and loves Winona Ryder's even more. Ryder seems chirpy at some moments, but when her face floods with worry or regret, Khondji floods her face and liquid eyes with sweetest luminescence, while also retaining the layers of gloom, steel, muck and damp in the corridors or passageways behind her. The movie moves like the wind, then pauses for a close-up, then moves on, again and again. $4. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 6:45, 9, 11:15.

*CLUELESS See Mar 5. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11:40.

DISCLOSURE See Mar 5. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7.

DREAM LIFE (La vie reve) (1972, Canada) Directed by Mireille Dansereau. First feature film made by a woman in Quebec, and one of Canada's earliest feminist films. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 8.

*FAST, CHEAP & OUT OF CONTROL (1996, USA) Directed by Errol Morris. The pleasure of knowledge for its own sake seems to be at the core of Morris' enigmatic, elegant contraption of a movie, "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control." Yet his concatenation of four subjects that seem impossibly disparate suggests a quirky universe the meanings of which can be found only in unsettling juxtapositions, such as Morris creates with these four men's work: a lion tamer; a robot designer who believes silicon-based life will succeed the carbon-based variety; a topiary sculptor whose work will likely not outlive him and a man fixated on a strange, blind, subterranean mammal, the naked mole rat, which resembles a penis with fierce teeth. $5. Village (312)642-2403, 1548 N. Clark, Midnight.

FILMS BY CANADIAN WOMEN A lecture by Canadian critic Tom McSorley about the contributions of women to the film culture up north, illustrated with video clips. 109m. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 6.

*MATERIAL, STRUCTURE, FORM, ANIMATION A program of new work from Germany, utilizing found footage and manipulations. With "Curtain Sing Song" (1993, 2m) by Johannes Przygodda; "Bread"(1994, 3m) by Deborah Phillips; "Crofton Road SE.5" (1990, 5m) by Gerd Gockell; "The Flamethrowers" (1988-90, 9m) by Owen O'Toole, Alte Kinder, Schmelzdahin; "A Proven Partner" (1993, 22m) by Jurgen Reble; "The Porcelain Shop Part I and II" (1995, 21m) by Franz Winzensten; "3 Tiny Poems" (1996, 10m) by Hans Joachim Hofmann; "That Is the House from Nicholas" (1992, 10m) by Lutz Garmsen; "Room 22" (1995, 12m) by Marin Hansen; "Ah Pook Is Here" (1994, 6m) by Philip Hunt; and "Clocks" (1995, 7m) by Kirsten Winter. Free. SAIC, 112 S. Michigan Ave., 13th floor screening room., 7.

OFFICE KILLER (1997, USA) Directed by Cindy Sherman. The eminently collectible photographer turns her attention to moving pictures with this horror comedy about the camp and bloody goings on at Manhattan's "Constant Consumer" magazine. Murder; oh my. Starring Carol Kane, Molly Ringwald, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Barbara Sukowa and Michael Imperioli. Written by Elise MacAdam and Tom Kalin ("Swoon"). 81m. $7.75. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, Midnight.

*THE PILLOW BOOK (1996, England-France-Netherlands-Japan) Directed and Written by Peter Greenaway. The lasting pleasures of Greenaway's movies are seldom simply those of narrative, but of found references, chance juxtapositions, painterly eruptions, moments that privilege the viewer in unexpected ways. Water and the shadows of reflected ripples suffuse "The Pillow Book." Hong Kong is shown as all urban delirium and dissociation, then the ripple of watery reflection plays off almost all of the miraculous, unaffordable dream decors of homes and cafs and restaurants. Even fire is photographed with the rippling caress of water. For the eyes, the ears, maybe even the mind. Panavision. $5. Village (312)642-2403, 1548 N. Clark, Midnight.

*THE ROCK (1996, USA) Directed by Michael Bay. Equal parts va-voom and ba-boom, it's either a narcotic or the Apocalypse, and who ever said self-annihilation wasn't addictive? Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 9:15.

*SICK: THE LIFE AND OF BOB FLANAGAN, SUPERMASOCHIST (1997, USA) Directed by Kirby Dick. The phrase "pain of creation" achieves new heights of meaning after you've seen Kirby Dick's extraordinary documentary, "Sick: The Life and Death of Bob Flanagan, Supermasochist." "Sick" is an exacting portrait of the late performance artist, poet, lifelong sufferer of cystic fibrosis and "hetero masochist, in extremis" Bob Flanagan. "I've learned to fight sickness with sickness" was Flanagan's standard, typically jokey description of how his masochism helped him endure the chronic pain of CF. In collaboration with his longtime lover and collaborator Sheree Rose, what had been private ritual became a very public art. At his death at 43, Flanagan had lived double the years anyone in his condition is expected to live, and the pain he suffered--fundamentally a slow, breath-by-breath drowning--led him to explore the world of pain with great wit and knowledge. Dick, a friend of Flanagan's, has made a funny, beautifully nuanced, even tender film, touching on issues of intimacy in relationships in art and life in a way that could probably not be depicted in any other genre. 85m. $5. Village (312)642-2403, 1548 N. Clark, Midnight.

*VERTIGO (1958, USA) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. "Vertigo" leaves me cold. And it's not just Kim Novak's secondhand Grace Kelley, her plump inability to rise above featureless frowse. Yes, Hitchcock's much-revered movie turns dizzyingly perverse, but it's never dazzlingly perfect. There are daring moments--Hitchcock had a fondness for providing reams of exposition, to brain-deadening lengths, which he does in the first few scenes of "Vertigo." Then, unshackled by the need to provide information, he sends Jimmy Stewart's detective-in-search-of-a-soul on a wordless journey through 1957 San Francisco, his coral De Soto saloon puttering a few yards behind Novak's deep green Jaguar. It should hypnotize. Intellectually, I get it, and the ending has a grandeur worthy of the largest gestures of grand opera, but any deep emotional response on my part would have to be willed. 128m. $5. Village North (773)764-9100, 6746 N. Sheridan, Midnight.

WORLD'S BEST COMMERCIALS '97 A bunch of them, eighty-six from twenty countries in all, unedited and without content interruption. Junior copywriters--on your marks, get set, go! Naw, I forgot, you get on-demand dubs of this stuff down at Burnett that must look twice as rotten as the blowup from video to 16. Waitaminit. Who the hell goes to this stuff anyway? Now I'm confused. 75m. $7.75. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, Midnight.


SAT/7

*BEAN (1997, England-The Netherlands) Directed by Mel Smith. Brief, brisk, dumb without undue kiddie gross-out gags, "Bean" is a giddy, stop-and-start laugh machine, capturing Rowan Atkinson's television-bred Bean character, a man of few words, in the middle of more than a couple of well-made pranks and an even greater number of sloppily-shot and hastily-cobbled ones. (This time out, Smith eschews the "Un film de Mel Smith" credit he had taken on "The Tall Guy.") Bean is a cruel child, his expressions the gleeful garble of a nasty baby. He gets thrown off planes, lies, blows up Thanksgiving turkeys, draws graffiti on masterpieces. Some are funny, some are funnier, and it's all over very quickly. Working with writer Richard Curtis ("Blackadder," "4 Weddings & A Funeral"), one would hope that Bean will find himself in the center of a comedy of sustained brilliance, rather than an intermittently wonderful one that grossed over $100 million worldwide before opening in the U.S. 85m. $4. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7, 9 11.

*BLUE SKIES (1946, USA) Directed by Stuart Heisler. Bing Crosby as a restless, Scorseseian irresponsible; also starring Fred Astaire, Joan Caulfield and Robert Benchley. 104m. Shown with Friz Freleng's 1936 "Bingo Crosbyana." $3. LaSalle Theater (312)904-2507, 4901 W. Irving Park, 8.

*CLUELESS See Mar 5. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11.

DISCLOSURE See Mar 5. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7.

*EVE'S BAYOU (1997, USA) Directed by Kasi Lemmons. See Main film listings. $4. International House, (773)753-2274, 1414 E. 59th, 8, 10.

*FAST, CHEAP AND OUT OF CONTROL See Mar 6. $5. Village (312)642-2403, 1548 N. Clark, Midnight.

*KIDS IN THE HALL: BRAIN CANDY (1995, Canada-USA) Directed by Kelly Makin. It's almost impossible to dislike a movie that opens as a ten-minute spot-on parody of the opening of Wim Wenders' so-German "Wings of Desire" (yet set in squeaky-squeaky Toronto) and puts its greatest effort into a corporate CEO whose hair, dress, manner and even Canadian drawl are a put-on of SNL uber-honcho Lorne Michaels, a gag that would require footnotes except for the fact that the preening puss on-screen plays as something original and hilarious instead of an obtuse gag someone had to clue you onto. What else? Oh yeah, jokes. An Ealing comedy on windowpane. "Bedazzled" meets "The Lawnmower Man." It's "Monty Python"'s version of "The Prisoner," but as intentional comedy. Blown up on the big screen, the suburban Canadian nihilo-anarcho-absurdo-dippiness of television's "Kids in the Hall" troupe invites that kind of strange, cross-bred reference. After several years of throwing shit, the writer-performers (Bruce McCulloch, Kevin McDonald, Mark McKinney, Scott Thompson, non-writer Dave Foley) seem finally to have discovered just how big the wall can be. "Brain Candy," a delirious, unkempt comedy about the havoc wreaked by an anti-depression drug peddled like Bubble Yum, is all over the place, an unregenerate mess, filled to the brim with cross-references more to their own fixations and bad taste than the usual infernal big-screen allusions to pop culture at large (cross-dressing, multiple roles, homosexual panic, delusions of modesty). Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 12:45am (Saturday).

LAST HURRAH FOR CHIVALRY (Hao Xia) (1978, Hong Kong) Directed by John Woo. Early, traditional kung-fu action pic from Woo, Including early use of his showy slow-motion prowess. 97m. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 8.

OFFICE KILLER See Mar 6. $7.75. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, Midnight.

*ONCE UPON A TIME IN CHINA AND AMERICA (Huang Fei Hong Zhi Xi Yu Xiong Xi) (1997, Hong Kong) Directed by Sammo Hung. Latest wild-west installment of the always-colorful Hong Kong martial arts historical saga, from the energetic martial arts choreographer, Sammo Hung. 100m. Widescreen. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 4.

*THE PILLOW BOOK See Mar 6. $5. Village (312)642-2403, 1548 N. Clark, Midnight.

*LA PROMESSE (1996, Belgium) Directed by Jean Pierre and Luc Dardenne. Uncommonly fierce drama from a pair of Belgian brothers who have been making documentaries for twenty years, "La Promesse" has a vigorous texture that only enhances its stark tale of Igor, a 15-year-old boy who must discover his own moral compass in the face of his father's exploitation of emigrant workers. Most of the Dardennes' work in documentary had focused on the Belgian labor movement of the 1960s, or in the words of Luc, "Our documentaries were generally about people who said 'no' at a time in their lives when almost everyone around them was saying 'yes.'" That's also the quandary Igor faces when one of his father's African illegal immigrants is killed: Igor makes promises to the man's survivors, but to his abusive father as well. Can he keep promises to both? And what promise can he keep for himself? A great drama, told with breathless immediacy and extraordinary texture. 96m. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, 11:30am.

THE ROCK See Mar 5. Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 9:15.

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (1975, England) Directed by Jim Sharman. You do the Time Warp again, leave me out of it. With Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick. $5. Village North (773)764-9100, 6746 N. Sheridan, Midnight.

*THE SEA HAWK See Mar 7. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, 11:30am.

SHANGHAI GRAND (Xin Shang Hai Tan) (1996, Hong Kong) Directed by Poon Man-kit. Leslie Cheung and Andy Lau star in a Tsui Hark superproduction filled with lush 1940s atmosphere: Shanghai gangsters, gambling and opium fumes. With Ling Jing. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 6.

*VERTIGO See Mar 6. $5. Village North (773)764-9100, 6746 N. Sheridan, Midnight.

WORLD'S BEST COMMERCIALS '97 See Mar 6. $7.75. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, Midnight.


SUN/8

*ALIEN RESURRECTION See Mar 6. $4. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 2.

*CLUELESS See Mar 5. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11:30.

DISCLOSURE See Mar 5. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7.

*EAST SIDE STORY (1996, USA) Directed by Dana Ranga. Excerpts from the strange history of the Soviet musical comedy. $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7.

*EVE'S BAYOU See Mar 6. $4. International House, (773)753-2274, 1414 E. 59th, 8.

A GREAT WALL (1986, USA) Directed by Peter Wang. A gentle comedy from the laser-scientist-turned-filmmaker compares Chinese Americans to their mainland relatives. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 6.

*KIDS IN THE HALL: BRAIN CANDY See Mar 7. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 10.

*ONCE UPON A TIME IN CHINA AND AMERICA See Mar 7. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 4.

*LA PROMESSE See Mar 7. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, 11:30am.

*THE SEA HAWK See Mar 7. Music Box (773)871-6604, 3733 N. Southport, 11:30am.

SHANGHAI GRAND See Mar 7. $6. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 2.

STRICTLY PROPAGANDA (1992, East Germany) Directed by Wolfgang Kissel. Compilation of bizarre images from forty years of East German propaganda. $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 5.


MON/9

DISCLOSURE See Mar 5. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11.

*EL MARIACHI (1993, USA) Directed by Robert Rodriguez. Rodriquez's energetic debut is notable, more startling because its first version was made for nothing--$7,000--as a demonstration reel, with hopes that it might, at best, be released to the Mexican action video market. It's a comedy of mistaken identity, with a nameless guitar-carrying mariachi confused with a killer who keeps his weapons in a guitar case. "El Mariachi" is well-acted, with an abundance of self-effacing humor, and the action sequences are fresh and adept, but the kinetic, fast-cut style developed by Rodriguez out of economic necessity is the picture's most striking asset (the abundant reaction shots from a lethargic pit bull are particularly funny). It's a surprisingly good-looking movie, with crisp, professional sound, and a colorful score, alternating ominous chords with original songs by lead Carlos Gallardo. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 8.

*KIDS IN THE HALL: BRAIN CANDY See Mar 7. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7:30.

*NO END (1984, Poland) Directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski. A ghost watches over his family and colleagues after martial law is set. Earlier Kieslowski with echoes of "Blue." 108m. $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7.


TUE/17

CLUELESS See Mar 5. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 9:30.

DAUGHTER RITE (1983, USA) Directed by Michelle Citron. Mother-daughter relationships examined through the re-photographing and slowing of home movie footage. Free. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 4:15.

*EL MARIACHI See Mar 9. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7:30..

THE FIVE HEARTBEATS (1991, USA ) Directed by Robert Townsend. Dispensable, lame fable of the rise and fall of a 1960s R&B group. Shown with the 1945 short, "Caldonia," with Louis Jordan (18m). $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7.

*KIDS IN THE HALL: BRAIN CANDY See Mar 7. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11:30.

*PIROSMANI (1971, USSR) Direcged by Georgy Shengelaya. Colorful portrayal of the life and art of Georgian folk artist Niko Pirosmani. 84m. Cezar Pawlowsi will lecture. Film Center (312)443-3733, Columbus Drive at Jackson, 6.


WED/18

*THE CROW (1994, USA) Directed by Alex Proyas. The late Brandon Lee is better than he was in his earlier performances, but it's only a good performance in a fairly violent, profane comic-book adaptation. "Dark City" director Proyas' stylish work puts over the comic-book nuttiness, and the grungy, low-grade fever-dream version of "Blade Runner" or "Streets of Fire" invented on the Wilmington, N.C., backlot is finely crafted. Proyas' compositions, use of primary-colored light against wet-black backdrops and hurtling low-angle traveling shots suggest a brighter version of fellow Aussie Russell Mulcahy. In some respects, particularly its look and artfully jarring transitions between shots, "The Crow" was the best comic-book adaptation up to 1994. In his previous starring role in "Rapid Fire," Lee's performance wasn't very good, but behind his action-film histrionics, there was a vulnerability, a feminine quality to his presence that suggested he could have become a very interesting action star. The most uncomfortable aspect of "The Crow" is the story itself: a man who was murdered rises from the grave to avenge the rapist-killers of his fiancee and himself, and, as a kind of ghost, repeatedly takes gunfire in his chest and back, including one fusillade of hundreds of bullets. A painful irony at film's end is the usual disclaimer that "the animals used in this motion picture were in no way mistreated." Projected video. Free. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 9:30.

*EL MARIACHI See Mar 9. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 11:45.

*KIDS IN THE HALL: BRAIN CANDY See Mar 9. Projected video. Celluloid Moviebar (312)707-8888, 1805 W. Division, 7:30.

*LOVE STREAMS (1984, USA) Directed by John Cassavetes. Cassavetes' last film. Writes Time Out London's Geoff Andrew, "As so often in Cassavetes' work, there's little plot: desperate attempts at a sexual life from a boozy, middle-aged writer staving off loneliness; a divorced woman's struggles to hang on to her husband, daughter and sanity... guided firmly by the director's customary emphasis on spontaneous, naturalistic performance, search for closeness, warmth and self-definition." 141m. $3. DOC Films (773)702-8575, University of Chicago, 1212 E. 59th, 7.








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