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Books

Volume I, Issue 38
February 23 - March 2, 1998

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London Calling
Author Peter Carey talks about his new novel, his approach to fiction and fact, and where he draws the line. [2]
Leonard Gill

David Foster Wallace
An interview with David Foster Wallace reveals what he really thinks of editors. [3]
Tom Scocca

Between Black and White
Two new books deal with the South's grim history of segregation and racial hatred. [4]
Marc Stengel and Elaine Phillips

In Person
George Plimpton, author of the biography "Truman Capote: In Which Various Friends, Enemies, Acquaintances, and Detractors Recall His Turbulent Career" spoke at recently in Texas. [5]
Claiborne Smith


Fiction
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Pink and Read
Gus Van Sant's new novel, "Pink." [6]
Sid Moody

Sexual Odyssey
Sex without consequences--what a concept! [7]
Jami Macarty

Slacking Toward Bethlehem
Alex Garland's "The Beach." [8]
Julie Birnbaum


Non-fiction
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Some of That Jazz
America's favorite curmudgeon on jazz innovators and imitators, and the writers who love them. [9]
Harvey Pekar

Nothing Personal
In a new biography, Andrew Motion tries to show us the political side of John Keats. [10]
Adam Kirsch

Street Smart
Journalist Lou Cannon manages to put into useful perspective the L.A. riots following the Rodney King beating. [11]
Christopher Weir

Media Mix
The latest media hot spot--magazines for teen girls. [12]
Liza Featherstone


W












ant to have some fun? Try to read this entire interview with Peter Carey, author of "Jack Maggs" and "Oscar and Lucinda," as if he were speaking in a feeble whisper. The poor bloke had laryngitis but, trouper that he is, went ahead with the interview anyhoo. With dedication like that, how can his novels be anything but great? You know?

This David Foster Wallace guy gives good interview too. I know what you're thinking: "gives good interview" is, like, so offensive. Sure it is, but it's, like, totally appropriate to the interview. And so is, like, my use of "like."

More interview action: Robert Ikard talks about the incident that forms the basis for his non-fiction book "No More Social Lynchings." An account of the 1946 "Mink Slide riot" in Columbia, Tennessee, the book would fit well into any library about famous racial-conflict situations in America. You could read the book, but why bother when the interview sums up the incident so well?

In other oral-author news, George Plimpton gave a reading/booksigning for his biographical "Truman Capote: In Which Various Friends, Enemies, Acquaintances, and Detractors Recall His Turbulent Career." Rumor has it he spent almost half the time saying the title. Read the story if you want to get beyond rumor.

Also reviewed or discussed this week:

I'm all booked out. See you next week, pulpface.


Mini Reviews
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Speed Reader
"Prisoners in my Backyard" by Maria L. Leyba; "Oscar & Lucinda" by Peter Carey; "Pragmatism: a Reader" by Lois Menand; "Loving Chloe" by Jo-Ann Mapson. [13]
Stephen Ausherman, Steven Robert Allen, Dan Scott, Todd Gibson


Now What?
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets. [14]


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