Weekly Wire

Volume III, Issue 34
February 14 - February 21, 2000  
 
Music

Artist Profiles
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Unguarded Moments [2]
Tywanna Jo Baskette's made-up songs are wonderfully peculiar, affecting, and utterly her own.
— Jim Ridley, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Cross-Culture [3]
The members of the Irani-Indian collaboration Ghazal hail from distinctly different cultural backgrounds, but their music succeeds because they love it.
— Banning Eyre, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Jammin' Salmon [4]
Leftover Salmon is known for their unique synthesis of classic country, Delta blues, southern boogie, high lonesome bluegrass, tropical rhythms and Cajun spice.
— Scott Cooper, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Shades of Green [5]
Over 20 years, frontman Green Gartside has overseen Scritti Politti's evolution from punk to hip-hop on their new "Anomie and Bohnomie."
— Douglas Wolk, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Album Reviews
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Storyteller [6]
On her new album "Telling Stories," Tracy Chapman delivers the same perfect earnestness about personal and political travails that made her popular two decades ago.
— Gary Susman, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Fuzz Boxers [7]
Mudhoney, the best and worst band of the late-'80s/early-'90s, have re-emerged from a post-grunge layer of dust with the two-disc retrospective, "March to Fuzz."
— Grant Alden, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Quiet Storm [8]
June Tabor mixes folk and jazz with stirring results.
— Michael McCall, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
High Cotton [9]
Shelby Lynne gets back to her roots, finally.
— Bill Friskics-Warren, NASHVILLE SCENE
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

H ere comes Tracy Chapman again, singing with perfect earnestness about personal and political travails as if earnestness had never gone out of fashion.

Every recorded reason Mudhoney -- the band who most embodied Seattle's singular fusion of urban punk and suburban metal -- mattered has been compiled and summarized on a glorious new two-disc retrospective.

Many of the events in Tywanna Jo Baskette's life, big and small, end up in songs, which seem to evoke something different in everyone who hears them. There are other tantalizing contradictions about her.

Also, an Irani-Indian collaboration, some Leftover Salmon, folk and jazz mergers from June Tabor, and more.

Mini Reviews
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Boston Phoenix CD Reviews [10]

  • Flying Saucer Attack
  • Static X
  • Phil Lee
  • Atom and His Package
  • Lo-Fidelity All Stars
  • Two Dollar Guitar
  • Hugh Tracey
  • Van Morrison/Lonnie Donegan/Chris Barber
Rhythm and Views [11]
  • Romero-Cody-Redhouse
  • The Catheters
  • Beatnik Termites
Turn Up That Noise [12]
  • Lester Young
  • Ani DiFranco
Now What? [13]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE
 
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