Weekly Wire

Arts & Leisure

Volume I, Issue 32
January 12 - January 20, 1998

Long live Martha Stewart!

This beautiful, kind-hearted, essentially perfect-in-every-way human being has become such a huge part of our collective consciousness that she even shows up in various articles from alternative weeklies.

In this piece, for example, Martha Stewart's name is invoked, rhetorically, to ask a serious question about the nature of Art.

Meanwhile, this article uses Martha's name to prove the bogus nature of psychic predictions.

I'm just surprised Martha Stewart wasn't ever mentioned in this article, in which a religious expert reflects on the coming apocalypse. Talk about a missed opportunity.

I'm not surprised, however, that Martha didn't come up in this article. It's about gaming -- you know, Magic: The Gathering, Dungeons & Dragons, stuff like that. Everybody knows Martha Stewart doesn't have time for playing those reindeer games. Not when there are doilies afoot!

When I grow up, I want to be just like Martha Stewart. Until then, I remain....

Performance
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Saenger Spectacle
Whatever its shortcomings, "The Phantom of the Opera" successfully creates a miracle of stagecraft. [6]
Dalt Wonk








Featured Articles
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In Defense of Elitism
What do Martha Stewart and Picasso have in common? [2]
David Ribar

Media Mix
If you want real prognostications for the year ahead, look to science. [3]
Leigh Rich

Mobile Home
The latest project from the architectural team of Mockbee Coke moves across various boundaries, physical and philosophical. [4]
Cory Dugan


Recreation
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The Year in Gaming
The Year in Gaming. [5]
Allen Varney


In the Gallery
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The Mythmakers
Mark Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb at Tulane's Newcomb Art Gallery through Feb. 21. [7]
D. Eric Bookhardt

Apocalypse Now
A professor at Chicago's DePaul University plumbs our deepest fears. [8]
Keith O'Brien

Southern Exposures
Timeless visions of Mexico and time-stopping views of tiny creatures are now showing at Etherton Gallery. [9]
Margaret Regan


Now What?
A gallery of captivating links to keep your imagination churning while the paint dries. [10]


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